The year I discovered Sagmeister

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BBC iWonder

Seen via the printed pages of Creative Review – the BBC’s iWonder looks like it could become the one to watch as a benchmark of online learning. The CR blog describes it as ‘is a responsive platform that combines archive footage and original content to create immersive online learning resources.’

BBC iWonder

A great article by Rachael Steven in the March issue of CR is packed with so much information I have – as an aide memoir – shamelessly quoted below…

‘….a responsive system that can be easily adapted to produce guides for any subject…text, images, audio and video can be uploaded by editorial teams in a matter of minutes using a CMS…scripts and guides have been co-authored by presenters…

Seen more as an extension to the programme it has linked the show tone with the guides ‘…in the past, the BBC’s factual content has an encylopaedic tone but the guides are from a particular person’s perspective…we thought audiences might be drawn to that’.

The work itself… ‘adhers to BBC brand guidelines and reflects the key Knowledge and Learning values such as ‘enlightened’ and ‘brilliantly curious’ it has a ‘more light hearted feel’…Each guide will be designed to reflect the content, so the look and feel will be fluid – but each guide ‘will use the same layout, icons and headers…also with ‘a choice of eight to ten colour palettes’.

Further info:

BBC’s Internet Blog written by the BBC’s online and technology teams – link for the post on their blog about iWonder

Dan Snow’s World War One

The article also references the New York Times Snow Fall creative – which from what I can gather is in essence an extended article – which has embedded films, animations, chapters – and creates a fully ‘immersive’ experience.

Filed under: Blogs, Design, Reference, UX design, , , , , , , ,

Nike – W+K Amsterdam

Human Printing Press for Nike by Wieden and Kennedy Amsterdam. Elaborate, creative but compared to other W+K/Nike work – I am not too sure.

‘The idea behind the ad ‘The strategy behind the film is ambitious: a desire to inspire Turkish sports fans not just to watch their favourite sports on TV but actually get out and participate themselves. To do this, the agency turned to a number of Turkish sports stars, including footballers Burak Yilmaz and Enes Ünal, to use their skills to help create an unusual poster for fans.’

‘The machines in the film took around three weeks to create, and then the whole thing was shot over two days in a massive warehouse outside Istanbul.’

Seen via @stbridelibraryCreative Review’s Ad of the week have an interview with the creatives behind the campaign – words and imagery CR.

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Filed under: Advertising, Design, Film, , , , , , , ,

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